Tag Archives: normandy

• Le Havre, the City Rebuilt by Auguste Perret

Visit: 2nd July 2017

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Le Havre is a city in Normandy that was heavily bombed during the Second World War and subsequently rebuilt in concrete in the 50s and 60s. It was the final stop on a cycling trip I took in early July with Ross (Chirag having organised the trip and then dropped out on the day of departure!).

 

We started by ferry from Portsmouth to Caen – a six hour voyage that gave time for a long lunch – before beginning our ride west along the coast toward Bayeux. The route took us along Sword beach, which was one of the sites taken by the Allies in the 1944 D-day landings. Sword was assigned to the British, whilst the Canadians had nearby Juno and the Americans Omaha and Utah.

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The ride was enjoyable as we turned inland, leaving behind coastal headwinds for the quiet country lanes of Normandy’s interior. After a while though we began to flag, resorting to my packet of prunes for a final burst of energy as we finally rode into Bayeux.

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The annual medieval fayre was taking place on the day we arrived, so we feasted on roasted meats and watched the townsfolk process by in a wide variety of strange costumes.

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Bayeux is best known as the home of the eponymous tapestry. This was the main reason for our detour to the city, though I was very impressed with the quality of its cathedral.

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We went to see the tapestry the next morning. It is 60 metres long and depicts the Norman version of events leading up to and during the 1066 Battle of Hastings – the last time anybody successfully invaded Great Britain. After Harold Godwinson reneged on a promise to let him take the throne of England, William of Normandy sailed across the channel and defeated Harold in battle. The Normans’ use of longbows is credited with giving them the edge, and Harold was supposedly killed when an arrow, fired high into the air, landed in his eye. Entrance to the museum comes with an audio guide that autoplays, keeping the flow of visitors moving along the tapestry as well as describing the events depicted in a way that really brings them to life. I would certainly recommend a visit to anybody visiting the area – it is one of the most interesting artefacts I have seen on my travels (and is not a World Heritage Site, by the way).

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Unfortunately the previous day’s cycling had taken its toll, and I was too saddle-sore to complete the planned 40 mile ride east to Deauville. So we took our bikes on the train, first travelling to Caen – where we ate lunch and looked around the castle – and then on to Deauville. A resort town on the coast, Deauville was our second night stop.

 

 

The next morning was the final day of our trip and I was ready to get back on the bike. We set off for Le Havre up an enormous hill, and stopped off in Honfleur for lunch (above). We then rode across the wide river Seine and past the large port of Le Havre before arriving into the rebuilt city mid-afternoon.

 

After being almost totally destroyed by bombardment in WWII the responsibility for its reconstruction was given to an architect by the name of Auguste Perret. Setting out his vision in the 1950s he was an early proponent of concrete. He designed a layout featuring wide streets and generally low-rise residential blocks, punctuated by a few taller towers. The tallest building is St Joseph’s Church, built as a memorial to the dead and designed to resemble a lighthouse.

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Unlike much British post-war development in concrete Le Havre is a pleasant place to be. It has not been allowed to slip into decrepitude through the familiar pattern of failed social policies and neglect, so still feels bright, open and forward-looking. There was very little left of the town following the war, but one building that did miraculously survive was Le Havre’s cathedral – a Baroque building from the 17th century. Like St Paul’s in London, with bombs falling all around it the cathedral somehow remained standing.

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We only had a couple of hours in Le Havre before our ferry was due to depart for Portsmouth. So, with that, we rode across to the terminal and boarded with the other cyclists and motorbikes and settled in for the longish journey home. I passed the time reading the Economist whilst Ross paid £6.50 to watch Baywatch II in the onboard cinema.

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